Introduction to Historical Theology by John Stoughton

John Stoughton [1807-1897], An Introduction to Historical Theology Being a Sketch of Doctrinal Progress From the Apostolic Era to the Reformation.John Stoughton’s Historical Theology covers the development of Christian doctrine from the early church to 1560. This title is in the public domain.

John Stoughton [1807-1897], An Introduction to Historical Theology Being a Sketch of Doctrinal Progress From the Apostolic Era to the Reformation. London: The Religious Tract Society, n.d. Hbk. pp.464. [Click to download complete book in PDF]

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Part I. From the Apostolic to the Nicene Period. A.D. 100-325.
    1. Distinguished Church Teachers
    2. Heretical Dogmas
    3. Lines of Generally Acknowledged Christian Doctrine
  • Part II. From the Council of Nicaea to the Development of Systematoic Theology. A.D. 325-730.
    1. Formative Influences
    2. Theological Results
    3. Theological Results (continued)
  • Part III. From the Development of Systematic Theology to the Full Development of Scholasticism. A.D. 730-1600.
    1. Eastern Divines
    2. Western Divines
  • Part IV. From the Full Development of Scholasticism to the Reformation. A.D. 1060-1518.
    1. Scholastic Divinity. 1060-1224.
    2. Scholastic Divinity (continued). 1060-1224.
    3. Scholastic Divinity (continued). 1060-1224.
    4. Scholastic Divinity (continued). 1224-1436.
    5. Popular Theology. 600-1500.
    6. Mysticism. 1097-1500.
    7. Preparation for Reform. 1350-1500.
    8. General Review. 200-1500.
  • Part V. From the Commencement of the Reformation in Germany under Luther to the Conclusion of it imn England under the Reign of Elizabeth. A.D. 1518-1560.
    1. Reformed Theology in Germany
    2. Reformed Theology in Switzerland
    3. Reformed Theology in France and Scotland
    4. Reformed Theology in Italy
    5. Reformed Theology in England
  • Conclusion

Introduction

In the present volume an attempt is made to trace the development of Dogmatic Theology.

Let me state what is meant by Dogmatic Theology. I distinguish it from Revelation on the one hand, and from Religion on the other. This distinction is of prime importance.

Theology is drawn from Revelation, and the human mind is a factor in the process. That from which a science is derived cannot be identical with the science itself; and, as it will appear that the process of forming theological conclusions is complicated, we shall find that the possibilities and probabilities of mistake are numerous. Even were the logical manipulation faultless, a distinction ought to be recognized between the Divine material and the result of its human handling; but the logical manipulation never has been faultless, and never will be. [Continue reading]